Skip to Content

Home » 19 Best Trees for Pool Area

19 Best Trees for Pool Area

*This post may have affiliate links, which means I may receive commissions if you choose to purchase through links I provide (at no extra cost to you). As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Please read my disclaimer for additional details.

Trees aren’t just good for offering fruits and saving the environment, they’re a great addition to any landscape.

Of the many places you can plant a tree in your environment, the pool area is one place trees offer multiple benefits.

When you get trees for your pool area, you get a natural source of shade. But that’s not all.

Trees for Pool Area

The trees will also add some aesthetics to the scenery and improve the air around the area.

If you are considering adding a tree for your pool area, we’ve got some options that you can try out.

This piece goes over some of the best trees for a pool area.

Before we proceed with the list, let’s answer a few vital questions.

How Far Does the Pool Need to Be From a Tree?

Generally, it is advised that you keep your pool at least 15 feet from any tree trunk.

But if there’s even more space, you should aim to keep your pool outside the perimeter of the tree’s drip line.

You may also have to remove some large branches that may affect the pool.

But in such cases, you should get an expert to do that.

There are a number of other ways trees can interfere with your pool if not well-spaced.

The roots of the trees, for one, can damage your pool. This might be less likely with concrete pools and one-piece pools, but it is more likely with a liner pool.

Besides the roots, the fruits, nuts, and seeds from trees can litter your pool as they drop.

Even leaves might be a problem, although to a lesser extent.

Pool Area Surrounded by Trees

Will the Pool Chlorine Kill a Tree?

While trees can have adverse effects on your pool if poorly-spaced, pools may also affect your trees.

The water in pools is usually treated with chemicals to improve its quality. One of the most common of such chemicals is chlorine.

While chlorine is perfectly fitting for human use, it could make the surrounding trees sick.

Water containing chlorine at concentrations as low as 0.5 parts per million can cause problems for your tree.

In fact, some trees like Crabapple, Dogwood, and Pin Oak might be affected by even lower chlorine concentrations.

Besides chlorine concentration, some other factors also affect chlorine toxicity in trees.

These factors are the amount of pool water that gets to the tree, duration of exposure, and state of the tree (dormant or growing).

So, what signs do you see when a tree is experiencing chlorine toxicity?

The first signs of chlorine toxicity in a tree will be seen on the leaves.

Such leaves would appear burned and brown with some dead tissues around the edges.

Some other leaves may become yellow and stunted, then bud off early.

Chlorine toxicity could ultimately end up causing the death of your tree. But this can be avoided.

Pool Chlorine

Some of the ways to avoid chlorine toxicity are:

  • You could use milder alternatives to chlorine to disinfect your pool. One alternative is distilled white vinegar.
  • Do not chlorinate your pool for at least a week before draining it. This way, the chlorine will have dissipated before you drain it.
  • Before draining, ensure you test the pH of the pool water. The pH should be between 7 and 8 before you drain the water.
  • Do not drain all at once.; drain slowly so the soil can absorb the water gradually.

What do you do if you notice your tree has been affected by chlorinated water? The easiest thing to do is irrigate the soil with plenty of non-chlorinated water.

The chlorine-free water will dilute the chlorine in the soil and leach it away.

You could also add gypsum to the soil to remove the chlorine. Add about 58 lbs. of gypsum for every 1000 square ft. of topsoil.

If the options above do not help, you should call in an expert.

Two Types of Trees for Around the Pool

So, when you are getting trees for pool area, you could consider getting them for various reasons.

However, our list will focus on 2 main types of trees for around the pool:

  • Ornamentals – these types are kept for beautification.
  • Privacy Trees – these types are used as privacy screens.

19 Best Trees for Pool Area

Acacia

Acacia Tree Near Pool

Maximum Height: 20 to 40 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: Low litter

Root Depth/Width: A species of Acacia (Acacia mangium) has been shown to grow as wide as 21 feet after 21 months.

Fruitless Olive Tree

Fruitless Olive Tree Near Swimming Pool

Maximum Height: 30 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: Relatively litter-free, especially the Majestic Beauty

Root Depth/Width: Typically depends on the nature of the soil but widths up to 40 feet and depths up to 20 feet have been reported.

Windmill Palm

Windmill Palm at Outdoor Swimming Pool

Maximum Height: 40 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Privacy

Does It Drop Litter: No

Banana

Banana Tree at Swimming pool

Maximum Height: 10-23 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Privacy although some varieties can be ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No

Root Depth/Width: 5 feet deep and 16 feet wide

Citrus

Maximum Height: 18-22 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: Drops leaves when it is forming fruits and when it is blossoming. But even then, not many. Citrus also drop leaves in winter.

Root Depth/Width: 2-3 feet deep

Cypress

Maximum Height: 50-80 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Privacy

Does It Drop Litter: Yes, in the fall

Root Depth/Width: The roots extend 20-50 feet horizontally. But they only reach depths slightly below the soil surface.

Magnolia

Magnolia Tree at pool

Maximum Height: 80 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: Yes

Root Depth/Width: The root width is about 4 times the diameter of the tree canopy.

Arborvitae

Maximum Height: 40-60 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Privacy

Does It Drop Litter: No. They typically drop their leaves in the fall. But Dwarf Arborvitaes are noted to litter considerably.

Root Depth/Width: 0.7-2 feet deep

Oleander

Oleander Tree

Maximum Height: 8-12 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: No

Root Depth/Width: As wide as 12 feet

Spruce

Maximum Height: 60-200 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: Spruce trees usually start dropping needles after 2-3 years.

Root Depth/Width: About 1 foot deep

Holly

Maximum Height: 100 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Privacy

Does It Drop Litter: Holly trees usually only drop leaves in spring.

Root Depth/Width: 1.4-2.1 feet deep

Cane Palm

Cane Palm at  Swimming Pool

Maximum Height: 20-39 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No.

Root Depth/Width: 3.3 feet deep

Sago Palm

Maximum Height: 10-12 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No

Root Depth/Width: At least 1 foot

Sabal Palm

Sabal Palm

Maximum Height: 40-50 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No

Root Depth/Width: About 3.3 feet

Japanese Maple

Maximum Height: 30 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No

Root Depth/Width: Up to 3 feet deep and 12 feet wide

Desert Ironwood

Maximum Height: 45 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: It does during drought, but monthly watering can prevent this.

Floss Silk

Maximum Height: 50 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No

Palo Verde

Maximum Height: 20-40 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Both

Does It Drop Litter: Insignificant amount

Queen Palm

Queen Palm at swimming pool

Maximum Height: 50 feet

Ornamental or Privacy: Ornamental

Does It Drop Litter: No

Root Depth/Width: 1-4 feet deep and up to 12 feet wide

Resources

15 Types of Trees With White Flowers
← Read Last Post
Can Garden Spiders Bite?
Read Next Post →